Ten Years Later: How the Financial Crisis is Still Impacting Investors

  John Diehl     Tue Nov 28 09:30:00 EST 2017 

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Ten years ago, the U.S. housing market collapsed, which triggered the start of what is known as the Great Recession. Now that a decade has passed, Hartford Funds conducted a survey to find out how Americans were impacted and whether they changed their financial behaviors as a result. Three key points emerged from this survey that financial advisors may find to be particularly useful.

What Are You Afraid Of?

  John Diehl     Tue Oct 31 08:00:00 EDT 2017 

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Halloween is a time when fear is at the forefront, and we willingly watch scary movies, walk through haunted houses, and dress up as a witch, ghost, or zombie. But have you ever asked your clients what their biggest fear is? I’m willing to guess that it isn’t monsters or the undead or other fictional entities that make the hair on the back of their necks stand up, but rather the seemingly more tangible threats, like natural disasters, a stock market crash, nuclear war, hackers, or any other fear-inducing headline of late. So how can advisors curb their clients’ fears of losing everything?

Is a Bear Market Around the Corner?

  John Diehl     Mon Oct 23 14:30:00 EDT 2017 

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While last time I wrote about clients who become more optimistic as the bull market streak continues, there are also those clients who are notoriously glass-half-empty thinkers. With an eight-year bull market run and a consecutively positive 2017, these are the clients who feel that we’re due for a downturn, and are waiting with bated breath for the proverbial other shoe to drop. What can you do for clients whose strategy is to quit while they’re ahead?

Sink or Swim – Knowing When to Diversify in a Bull Market

  John Diehl     Wed Sep 06 10:00:00 EDT 2017 

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Investors have been reaping the benefits of a sustained bull market for some time now, which may instill in them a false sense of security and lead them to lose sight of risk levels in their portfolios.

While bull markets can be good news, they can also make your clients more susceptible to the hot hand fallacy – a term used to describe the behavior of expecting future results to mimic past results. In other words, since bull markets tend to encourage investor optimism, your clients may expect this upward streak to continue and, in turn, go “all in” with their investments.

The Rule of -ates: Flip It and Reverse It

  Michael Lynch     Thu Aug 31 13:00:00 EDT 2017 

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As summer comes to a close and we prepare to face the faster-paced fall season, advisors should consider taking time for a little self-reflection on their business. Are you serving your clients in a way that best benefits them? Do you understand what motivates them, and what emotional factors might affect their decision making?

In prior posts, we’ve talked about the rule of –ates, which helps advisors find out about clients’ backgrounds and social habits with regards to four key areas: educate, donate, recreate, and congregate. Learning about these details might not only help advisors inform their clients’ financial decisions better, but could also make the clients feel understood and appreciated. It has been said that emotion puts money into motion, so finding out what motivates individual clients is essential in today's market place.