Articles in "Baby Boomers" category:

Welcome to Retirement: The Onboarding Guide Your Clients Need

  Michael Lynch     Thu Nov 29 10:15:00 EST 2018 

When a person starts a new role at a new company, companies will usually have an onboarding program that gives the new employee all of the resources and information they need to hit the ground running. This initial training usually includes an HR orientation, a shadowing program with a tenured employee, a benefits overview, and a review of other rules and expectations.  The idea is to ensure the new hire is set up for success.

When a person enters retirement, there is no guide, handbook, or orientation setting them up for success. We should help soon-to-be retirees prepare in the same way a company helps new employees. Financial advisors are in a unique position to offer this kind of help, because they have witnessed the pitfalls, challenges, and successes of myriad retirements. Here are a few ways you can help your clients prepare for their transition into retirement.

Taking Care of Caregivers

  Michael Lynch     Mon Nov 12 09:00:00 EST 2018 

For the 34 million Americans who provide care for someone age 50 or older1, the 7 day a week, 24 hour a day responsibility can be exhausting. They may be taking care of a spouse and/or one or more parents, sometimes while raising their own children. It’s a full-time job that they may be doing on top of their regular 9-to-5.

Being a caregiver is a physically, financially, and mentally challenging role. It can include being a chauffeur, a chef, a nurse, a housekeeper, and so much more.

November 13 is National Caregiver Appreciation Day, which is a good time for financial advisors to think about how to make their caregiver-clients’ lives easier. There are a few ways that financial advisors can help their clients who are already caregivers, or are primed to take the role in the future.

Invest for What: Bringing Retirement out of the Abstract

  Michael Lynch     Tue Jun 05 11:00:00 EDT 2018 

blog_Quality of Life

Retirement may seem like a far-off, intangible concept for many people, and yet, from an early age, we regularly allocate a sizeable portion of our income to fund it.  Saving for retirement is expected, but it can be hard to plan for a future that is almost completely unknown—it is almost like paying a mortgage on a house you’ve never seen.

When I think back to when my wife and I bought our home, we had a laundry list of specifications: location, taxes, number of bedrooms/bathrooms, size of the kitchen, single-family home or a townhome, etc. When we found houses that met enough of our criteria, we visited each one and weighed the pros and cons until we purchased the one we loved.

I can’t say I would agree to pay for a home that I’ve never seen, and yet telling clients to save for retirement is essentially asking them to put money aside for something they’ve never experienced. Retirement can be ambiguous and unpredictable, but it is also—like buying a house—one of the most substantial investments we make in our lifetime. Shouldn’t we also have a list of criteria for how we want to live in retirement?

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