Articles in "MIT AgeLab" category:

Are Ice Cream Cones in Your Clients’ Retirement Budgets?

  Michael Lynch     Thu Sep 20 10:00:00 EDT 2018 

There isn’t much that can compare to an ice cream cone on a hot summer day or early evening. Remember all those childhood summers spent at the beach or the boardwalk eating an ice cream cone, trying to finish it faster than it could melt and make a mess? Memories like these, of the little things in life that can bring a smile to your face, are the cherished moments we hope to have again and again.

Whether it’s going out for ice cream or engaging in another treasured pastime, I would like to be able to continue making those memories when I get older, and share those experiences with my spouse, friends, children, or grandkids. Many of your clients probably hope to be able to do the same, especially as they enter retirement and have more time on their hands.

Addressing the Three R’s of Advisor Anxiety: Robos, Revenue, and Regulation

  Ryan Sullivan     Tue Jun 12 11:15:00 EDT 2018 

Besides concern for their clients, what else keeps financial advisors up at night? Chances are they're worrying about one or more of the three R’s: robos, revenue, and regulation. With the rapidly changing financial services landscape that these and other trends have caused, financial advisors may have some anxiety over how their practices will be impacted and what the future holds for the profession.

Fortunately, there is a way for advisors to deepen their value while also responding to the threats of the three R’s: provide more than investment advice alone. Rather than focusing solely on portfolio construction and risk mitigation, advisors can position themselves as a resource for personalized guidance and tailored education at any life stage—assisting in all aspects of life planning, goal setting, retirement, and aging. While many advisors already do some elements of this and quality investment planning remains essential, there may be an even greater opportunity to help clients and address the risks associated with the three R’s.

The Future of Advice

  Bill McManus     Tue May 01 11:00:00 EDT 2018 

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The retirement landscape is evolving, and many investors may not be as prepared as they think they are for this stage of their life. People are living longer, each generation is becoming more educated, family dynamics are changing, and technology is infiltrating every part of our lives. For a financial advisor, these trends may mean that your clients’ needs and their expectations of your role are expanding.

We recently hosted Dr. Joe Coughlin of the MIT AgeLab to discuss how advisors can transition into what the MIT Age Lab has coined a “longevity-based advisor.” A longevity-based advisor guides clients with education, resources, and solutions to the challenges that longer lifespans and this new retirement can present.

Ten Years Later: How the Financial Crisis is Still Impacting Investors

  John Diehl     Tue Nov 28 09:30:00 EST 2017 

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Ten years ago, the U.S. housing market collapsed, which triggered the start of what is known as the Great Recession. Now that a decade has passed, Hartford Funds conducted a survey to find out how Americans were impacted and whether they changed their financial behaviors as a result. Three key points emerged from this survey that financial advisors may find to be particularly useful.

8,000 Days

  Stephen Parnell     Mon May 15 15:30:00 EDT 2017 

Retirement is often talked about as an end—it’s the end of one’s career, it’s the last stage of one’s life, it’s the end game. Clients might be focused on how to prepare for retirement, which is critically important, but if they’re looking at retirement as the final goal, then they might not be preparing in the best way.

I recently sat down with Dr. Joseph F. Coughlin, PhD, Director of the MIT AgeLab, to discuss the dichotomy of retirement—it is seen as an end, but it can actually make up more than a decade or two of one’s life—and he gave me his perspective on how to help clients navigate what he refers to as the 8,000 days of retirement. I asked Dr. Coughlin to share his 8,000 days analogy for the purposes of this blog, and the following is his contributed content: