Articles in "2018 June":

Addressing the Three R’s of Advisor Anxiety: Robos, Revenue, and Regulation

  Ryan Sullivan     Tue Jun 12 11:15:00 EDT 2018 

Besides concern for their clients, what else keeps financial advisors up at night? Chances are they're worrying about one or more of the three R’s: robos, revenue, and regulation. With the rapidly changing financial services landscape that these and other trends have caused, financial advisors may have some anxiety over how their practices will be impacted and what the future holds for the profession.

Fortunately, there is a way for advisors to deepen their value while also responding to the threats of the three R’s: provide more than investment advice alone. Rather than focusing solely on portfolio construction and risk mitigation, advisors can position themselves as a resource for personalized guidance and tailored education at any life stage—assisting in all aspects of life planning, goal setting, retirement, and aging. While many advisors already do some elements of this and quality investment planning remains essential, there may be an even greater opportunity to help clients and address the risks associated with the three R’s.

Invest for What: Bringing Retirement out of the Abstract

  Michael Lynch     Tue Jun 05 11:00:00 EDT 2018 

blog_Quality of Life

Retirement may seem like a far-off, intangible concept for many people, and yet, from an early age, we regularly allocate a sizeable portion of our income to fund it.  Saving for retirement is expected, but it can be hard to plan for a future that is almost completely unknown—it is almost like paying a mortgage on a house you’ve never seen.

When I think back to when my wife and I bought our home, we had a laundry list of specifications: location, taxes, number of bedrooms/bathrooms, size of the kitchen, single-family home or a townhome, etc. When we found houses that met enough of our criteria, we visited each one and weighed the pros and cons until we purchased the one we loved.

I can’t say I would agree to pay for a home that I’ve never seen, and yet telling clients to save for retirement is essentially asking them to put money aside for something they’ve never experienced. Retirement can be ambiguous and unpredictable, but it is also—like buying a house—one of the most substantial investments we make in our lifetime. Shouldn’t we also have a list of criteria for how we want to live in retirement?